A Reviewer’s Take on Poplar Lake

Poplar Lake - NON 2018 edition

Poet and scholar Bill Robertson recently reviewed Poplar Lake for the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, a PostMedia newspaper.

Robertson describes Poplar Lake (the novel) as ambitious in scope, and Poplar Lake (the town) as an archetype of prairie settlements. He places the book squarely in its contemporary context. “After years of living in the shadow of an edifice called Canadian Literature, in which its many settler novels featured no First Nations people, as if the land was simply empty and hard-working immigrants were given a stake in it by a beneficent government, writers such as Thompson have woken to a new day. In the light of the Truth and Reconciliation hearings, these writers want to include First Nations people in their narrative, and Thompson does.”

He goes on to say: “Thompson’s got everything here to make a great Canadian novel, and he goes a long way to writing just that.”

Robertson has criticisms of Poplar Lake, particularly on its narrative style (mea culpa – my call entirely, and I own it proudly), but said in summary of it: “I enjoyed reading the book, and it kept me with it.”

About Poplar Lake:

Poplar Lake’s publisher NON describes the book as “a darkly satiric novel about families and relationships and the day-to-day lies that sustain them, a tragicomedy rich with yearning, heartbreak, and love.”  Terry Fallis, two-time winner of Canada’s Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour, has said of it, “In Poplar Lake, Ron Thompson has written a captivating story, rich with humour and heart. I didn’t want it to end.”

Poplar Lake is available on-line and in select bookstores, Chapters-Indigo, and McNally Robinson locations. See Poplar Lake’s publisher page here. Bill Robertson’s full review in the Star-Phoenix can be found here.

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